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St Andrews Sands: Part Eleven

As we know all too well, as lovable and quaint as St Andrews is, there come moments where not even the sight of the never-ending North Sea can alleviate the feeling that we’re being held hostage within the town’s three streets.

Here’s a thought: imagine if you were stranded on the sands of St Andrews..?

Taking inspiration from BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs, every week our resident writers will deliver their choice of five albums, to be their one and only soundtrack, if they were ever forever stranded on the beaches of St Andrews…

THE ALBUMS

1. Prince of Denmark, The Body (2013)
Giegling label artist Prince of Denmark aka Traumprinz is definitely one of electronic music’s finest. A mysterious Prince refuses to play any club gigs and focuses only on production. And to be fair, this strategy pays off. His latest album The Body fully represents what techno music has to offer today. repetitive beats, gentle backbeat and a creative use of production instruments create a pure beast. For me, this album represents the reality, because listening to its tracks I can see where it all came from. It is everything around us, inspiration came from simple things and was put on to 4/4 time signature to make people dance. Yet, there is something out of space. Pure love between a man and machine.

2. Daniel Avery, Drone Logic (2013)
The innovative sound of Daniel Avery’s Drone Logic drew my attention as soon as it was released. Acid can be felt in every track yet none of them can be called classic Chicago or UK acid tracks. The whole album can be played at one long rave, making people travel through Avery’s take on what it’s like to be tripping. It is not simply a cheap drug association, it is something higher than that. Tracks like ‘Water Jump’ and ‘Free Floating’ engage you with their progressive chords, building up nicely for ‘Need Electric’ until your average raver gets tired. And here kicks off transparent ‘Knowing You’ll be Here’ to round off your album experience nicely. This whole experience cannot be really described but has to be lived.

3. Marcel Dettman, Translation EP (2011)
Marcel Dettman needs no introduction. Resident of infamous club Berghain and one of the best producers of Ostgut Ton, techno legend Dettman produces quality techno for a long time.Translation EP delivers very innovative stuff which sounds as if it was produced by aliens. The persistent and raw rhythm of Translation One and Translation Two is dark and heavy so some people might think that it is a bit too much for them. But if you open your mind and let it absorb you fully, you will understand how magical this EP is.

4. Caribou, Swim (2010)
This is music made out of air and liquid, not metal. No distinct label can be put on Caribou’s album. It is synth-pop and techno and experimental electronica. Maybe that exactly attracts the listener or maybe it is magical sounds of the tracks, ‘Odesa’ being my personal highlight. As one listens to this album, the whole range of textures get uncovered, bringing a fresh feeling with every track. These synth and vocals make you travel deeper and deeper with every single creation. Caribou is definitely one of the most influential artists to date and listening to this album, I understand why.

5. Innervisions (Various Artists), Where We At (2006)
That’s where it all started. Innervisions is a known love of mine and there is no way I am leaving to a desert island without their creation. The first Innervisions LP, Where We At contains my favourite track of all time, ‘Rej’ which makes it a reason good enough to take it with me. However, this album is full of house bombs by other Innervisions artists: Tokyo Black Star, Henrik Schwarz and Marcus Worgull. They all will definitely make my time alone at the desert island a little bit more bearable. Even though it was produced in 2006, Innervisions sound that brings fresh and forward-thinking tracks into the world is already established. Carefully selected, hand crafted tracks makes this beautiful compilation a must-have for any house enthusiast.

Words: Nazira Kassenova

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